Well it looks like we are finally coming into our own as the weather patterns are starting to mellow out into the warming trends of summer. In other regions, they are still being rocked by hail and tornados, but as we approach May, our short-lived spring quickly becomes the dreaded flat season as hot air from the Gulf pours over us. Hurricane Season is right around the corner and we are due for a good one, especially after this whacky El Nino year we’ve been through, we await his sister La Nina to come and bring us some good surf! After a good run of waves the last few weeks, we are back to pre-summer conditions this week, and now is a great time to “summerize” your quiver and invest in a good fish, log or SUP from the awesome selections at our local surf shops. Don’t forget to support your local shapers!

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A few of these systems approaching could bring us some slightly bigger surf mid next week, but it’s a little far off to tell just now. So, what’s going on with ‘ol El Nino as he fades away into his last final days? If anyone remembers the following years after our last major El Nino, the Hurricane Season those years was pretty solid! The sea surface temperature reading taken within the Niño 3.4 region near the equator was at 1.1°C above average last week, down from 1.3°C above average during the prior week. El Niño conditions are now in the “moderate” category (1.0 to 1.5°C above average). Strong El Niño events typically weaken from winter into spring, and this process is expected to continue over the next few weeks. Based on weekly data, the current El Niño has been declining at roughly the same pace as the record-setting 1997-98 El Niño, although that event was already in the “weak” category by this point (0.6°C above average on April 15, 1998, and 0.7°C above average on April 22, 1998).

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It now appears likely that the Pacific will shift from El Niño to La Niña over the next few months. According to NOAA’s latest monthly outlook, El Niño conditions are likely to transition to neutral conditions (neither El Niño nor La Niña) during late spring and early summer 2016. The chance of La Niña conditions will increase to about 65 to 70 percent by autumn. Once in place, a La Niña event can last for two years or even longer. We’ve been waiting patiently Mother Nature! Bring us a good summer season ahead!


WEDNESDAY

SURF: 1-2ft
SWELL: ENE to ESE
WIND: SW winds 5-10 in AM turning SE 5-10 in PM

THURSDAY

SURF: 1-2ft
SWELL: ENE to ESE
WIND: SW winds 5-10 in AM turning SE 5-10 in PM

FRIDAY

SURF: 1-2ft
SWELL: ESE
WIND: WSW winds in AM less than 5 turning E 5-10 in PM

SATURDAY

SURF: 1ft
SWELL: ESE
WIND: SE winds 5-10 all day